Mortality, disease progression, and disease burden of acute kidney injury in alcohol use disorder subpopulation

Mortality, disease progression, and disease burden of acute kidney injury in alcohol use disorder subpopulation

ABSTRACT

Background

The aim of the study was to quantify the relationship between acute kidney injury (AKI) and alcohol use disorder (AUD).
 

Methods

We used a large academic medical center and the MIMIC-III databases to quantify AKI disease and mortality burden as well as AKI disease progression in the AUD and non-AUD subpopulations. We used the MIMIC-III dataset to compare two different methods of encoding AKI: ICD-9 codes, and the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes scheme (KDIGO) definition. In addition to the AUD subpopulation, we also present analyses for the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) and alcohol-related cirrhosis subpopulations identified via ICD-9/ICD-10 coding.
 

Results

In both the ICD-9 and KDIGO encodings of AKI, the AUD subpopulation had a higher incidence of AKI (ICD-9: 43.3% vs. 37.92% AKI in the non-AUD subpopulations; KDIGO: 48.65% vs. 40.53%) in the MIMIC-III dataset. In the academic dataset, the AUD subpopulation also had a higher incidence of AKI than the non-AUD subpopulation (ICD-9/ICD-10: 12.76% vs. 10.71%). The mortality rate of the subpopulation with both AKI and AUD, HRS, or alcohol-related cirrhosis was consistently higher than that of the subpopulation with only AKI in both datasets, including after adjusting for disease severity using two methods of severity estimation in the MIMIC-III dataset. Disease progression rates were similar for AUD and non-AUD subpopulations.
 

Conclusions

Our work shows that the AUD patient subpopulation had a higher number of AKI patients than the non-AUD subpopulation, and that patients with both AKI and AUD, HRS, or alcohol-related cirrhosis had higher rates of mortality than the non-AUD subpopulation with AKI.